Energy Codes & Standards - Lutron
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Energy & Sustainability

Codes & Standards for US & Canada

Building Energy codes and standards play a key role in helping reduce energy consumption and improve performance in today’s buildings. These codes and standards provide mandatory requirements for new construction as well as major renovations. If you’re looking for increased efficiency and performance, numerous green building rating systems also exist in addition to the mandatory codes and standards.

EnergyCodes.html

Find commercial and residential building lighting and receptacle control requirements for your state or province*



* This website summarizes the lighting and receptacle control requirements for commercial and residential buildings. It is for information purposes only. It is not meant to replace your state’s, province’s or local jurisdiction’s official energy code. Please refer to your local building energy code or authority having jurisdiction for your precise requirements. Only the authority having jurisdiction can guarantee code compliance.

ASHRAE 90.1 Lutron Resources

The resources listed below provide suggested, code compliant solutions based on total installed cost, simplicity of design, and basic functional needs for the space. The solutions provided below represent one of multiple compliant options to meeting lighting and receptacle control requirements. These solutions are based on Lutron’s interpretation of the energy code and are not meant to replace your state’s, province’s or local jurisdiction’s official energy code.

Application Summaries Vive Application Guides
2016 2016
2013 2013
2010 2010
2007


ASHRAE 90.1 Yearly Comparison Chart

Applies to New Construction Applies to New Construction & Retrofits
2007 2010 2013 2016
Local Control
Bilevel or Multilevel Control
Scheduled Shutoff
Occupancy Sensor
Restricted to Manual ON
Restricted to Partial Automatic ON
Automatic Partial OFF
Automatic Full OFF
Occupancy Sensor Timeout 30 min 30 min 20 min 20 min
Daylight Responsive Control
Receptacle Control*
Guest room Control Manual Manual Automatic Automatic
For more information on each of the control strategies listed in this table, please refer to the application summaries shown above this table.

*Required in new construction and in retrofits when receptacles are modified as part of the retrofit.

ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1

The American National Standards Institute (ANSI), American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers Inc. (ASHRAE) and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) jointly sponsor the ASHRAE/ IESNA Standard 90.1, “Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings." An updated version of ASHRAE 90.1 is released every three years. The latest version is ASHRAE 90.1-2016. Lutron actively participates in the development of this standard by not only advocating for increased energy efficiency, but also voicing the opinions and concerns of our customers.

IECC Lutron Resources

The resources listed below provide suggested, code compliant solutions based on total installed cost, simplicity of design, and basic functional needs for the space. The solutions provided below represent one of multiple compliant options to meeting lighting and receptacle control requirements. These solutions are based on Lutron’s interpretation of the energy code and are not meant to replace your state’s, province’s or local jurisdiction’s official energy code.

Application Summaries Vive Application Guides
2018 2018
2015 2015
2012 2012
2009


IECC Yearly Comparison Chart

Applies to New Construction & Lighting Retrofits
2009 2012 2015 2018
Manual Control
Light Reduction Control
Time-Switch Controls
Occupancy Sensor Control
Restricted to Manual ON
Restricted to Partial Automatic ON
Automatic Full OFF
Occupancy Sensor Timeout 30 min 30 min 20 min
Daylight Responsive Control
Manual
Automatic
Guest room Control Manual Manual Automatic Automatic
For more information on each of the control strategies listed in this table, please refer to the application summaries shown above this table.

International Energy Conservation Code

The International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) is part of the “I-Codes” produced by the International Code Council (ICC). An updated version of the IECC is released every three years. The latest version is IECC 2018. Lutron actively participates in the development of this standard by not only advocating for increased energy efficiency, but also voicing the opinions and concerns of our customers.

2016 California Title 24 Overview

Since 1978, all new and altered buildings in California are required to meet the minimum efficiency standards defined in California Title 24, Part 6, of the California Energy Commission energy efficiency code.

These standards, which are regarded as the most stringent of all energy codes, were adopted in response to a legislative mandate to reduce California's energy consumption. They help conserve electricity and natural gas and prevent the state from having to build more power plants. ln fact, Title 24 has saved Californians more than $74 billion in reduced electricity bills since 1978. California's per capita electricity usage has stayed largely flat since the mid-70s, largely due to the Title 24 energy efficiency standard, while the average American's went up by 50%.

The 2016 version of the standard will be effective on January 1, 2017. All newly constructed or altered commercial and residential buildings in the state of California must comply with the 2016 standard, including all the mandatory lighting control requirements.

What are the new lighting requirements in the Title 24 2016 Standard?

The biggest changes in the commercial lighting arena are:

  • Lower lighting power densities
  • Multilevel lighting control requirements simplified
  • Occupancy control requirements modified
  • Less stringent control requirements for existing building lighting alterations

The biggest changes in the residential lighting arena are:

  • All lighting must be high efficacy
  • Tougher qualification requirements for high efficacy light sources (JA8 compliant lights)
  • Simplified lighting and control requirements


Residential Summary

California Title 24 2016 – Residential

California was among the first states to adopt building standards as a way to regulate energy consumption, in the form of Title 24.

Since its inception, the scope of this code's standards has increased. The latest policy, Title 24 2016, has significantly modified lighting needs in new and remodeled homes, so that all such homes in California must incorporate energy efficient lighting and controls.

Lutron products, such as dimmers and vacancy sensors, provide cost effective, easy-to-install solutions to save energy while meeting the Title 24 2016 requirements.

CA Title 24 Residential Lighting Requirements Summary

Starting January 1, 2017, California Title 24 will require the following in all new residential construction and renovation requiring a permit:
  • At least one vacancy sensor installed to control lights in bathrooms, garages, laundry rooms, and utility rooms.
  • A dimmer or vacancy sensor installed to control all indoor recessed ceiling downlights and all indoor permanently installed lighting containing screw-in lamps or LED lights.1,2

Exceptions:
  • closets smaller than 70 ft2
  • hallways
  • decorative colored LED lighting containing non-replaceable LED’s

Title 24 Solutions

  • Dimmers
    • Forward phase-cut dimmers controlling LEDs must comply with NEMA SSL 7A
  • Vacancy sensors
    • Must be certified Title 24 compliant
    • Must be manual-on/automatic-off
    • Must turn off automatically in 30 minutes
    • Cannot be locked in a permanent "on" state
  • High efficacy lights
    • Pin-based linear or compact fluorescent (CFL)
    • Pulse-start metal halide
    • High pressure sodium lamps
    • GU-24 socket for CFLs
    • inseparable LED light sources for outdoors
    • Induction lamps
    • Colored LED indoor lights
    • JA8 lights2


1Dimmers and LED lighting must comply with NEMA SSL 7A which ensures the dimmer and LED light work together.

2Lamps installed in recessed ceiling downlights, screw-in lamps, and LED lamps must comply with Title 24 Joint Appendix 8 (JA8) which ensures high efficiency, nice color characteristics, long life, 10% dimming, and low levels of audible noise and flicker.


Code Requirements Per Room


Kitchen

Permanently installed lighting in kitchens must be high-efficacy lighting. JA8 lights (non-colored LEDs, screw-based bulbs and recessed ceiling downlights) must be controlled by vacancy sensors or dimmers.


Living Room, Bedroom, and Family Room

Lighting installed in these rooms of the home shall be high efficacy, and JA8 lights (non-colored LEDs, screw-based bulbs and recessed ceiling downlights) shall be controlled by either dimmers or vacancy sensors.


Bathrooms, Garage, Laundry Room, and Utility Room

Lighting installed in attached and detached garages, laundry rooms, and utility rooms shall be high-efficacy and At least one luminaire in each of these spaces must be controlled by vacancy sensors.


Outdoor Lights (attached to the home)

For single-family residential buildings, outdoor lighting permanently mounted to a building must be high efficacy and controlled with manual on/off switch plus one of the following:

  • Photocell and motion sensor
  • Photocell and time switch
  • Astronomical time clock
  • Energy Management Control System (EMCS) with the features of an astronomical time clock


Disclaimer:This website summarizes the CA Title 24 2016 lighting control requirements for residential buildings. It is for information purposes only. For complete and precise details refer to Section 150.0 (k) of the California Title 24 2016 Building Energy Efficacy Standards.


Commercial Summary

California Title 24 2016 - Commercial

California was among the first states to adopt building standards as a way to regulate energy consumption, in the form of Title 24.

Since its inception, the scope of this code's standards has increased. The latest version of these standards, Title 24 2016, will be effective on January 1, 2017, and apply to all newly constructed or altered buildings.

Lutron offers a number of solutions to help comply with the new standards' lighting control requirements. From stand-alone vacancy sensors to an entire building control system, Lutron has a solution for any size project and budget.


Lighting Control Requirements

Recommended Lutron Solutions are representative of the component which will help to meet each of the individual requirements and may not signify the entire control solution. For complete control solution information by application, please view the below resources.
Title 24 2016 Quick Reference Guide
Title 24 2016 Lutron Vive Application Guide


Area Control

Each area enclosed by ceiling-height partitions must have an accessible independent switching or control device (such as a manual switch or dimmer) to control the general lighting.



Automatic Shut-off

All indoor lighting systems must include a separate shut-off control, such as an occupancy/vacancy sensor or timeclock.


Automatic Partial-off

Lighting in enclosed stairwells and corridors shall have one or more control devices to automatically reduce lighting power by at least 50% within 20 minutes of vacancy.


Daylight Zone Control (Automatic)

Areas in daylight zones shall have automatic control for the general lighting based on the daylight in the space. Typically, a daylight sensor and dimming ballasts / drivers that control at least 50% of the general lighting power meet this requirement. Switched daylight control also complies with code, but is more disruptive to occupants.

Lutron Solutions

Radio Powr savr wireless daylight sensor
Wired daylight sensor


Demand Response

Buildings larger than 10,000 square feet shall be capable of automatically reducing lighting power by at least 15%, excluding spaces with a lighting power density of 0.5 watts per square foot.


Exterior Control

Permanently installed outdoor lighting must be controlled by a daylight sensor or astronomical timeclock that automatically turns off the lighting during daylight hours.


Functional Testing

Prior to inspection, lighting controls must be tested to ensure that they are working properly. Lutron field service has Certified Lighting Control Acceptance Testing Technicians on staff to perform this functional testing.

Lutron Solutions

Lutron Services Co.


Guestroom Lighting Control (Automatic)

Guestrooms must be capable of automatically turning off all installed lighting when the room is vacant.


Multi-level Lighting Controls

Most spaces require dimming or at least 5 lighting levels, including ON and OFF.


Automatic Receptacle Control

Half of the receptacles in certain spaces must be automatically controlled with an occupancy/vacancy sensor or timeclock.

Lutron Solutions

20A PowPak relay module
20A Energi Savr Node with Softswitch
XP switching module
Click here to view our receptacle control system brochure



For Additional Information

Call the California Energy Commission (CEC):
Inside California +1.800.772.3300
Outside California +1.916.654.5106

Visit the CEC website at
www.energy.ca.gov/title24


Light Controls for Sustainable Design

Today's innovative buildings are designed to be sustainable, flexible and energy efficient. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) is a rating system the United States Green Building Council (USGBC) administers to provide a national standard for what constitutes a green building. LEED offers scientific performance criteria and a point system for LEED project certification. Many businesses have programs to ensure all their facilities are LEED compliant, through new construction and renovation programs. Lutron offers leading-edge product solutions for integrated control of electric lighting and daylight, and unsurpassed project support.


Lutron solutions may contribute to obtaining numerous points in LEED v4 for New Construction and Major Renovations (LEED v4) credit categories. To achieve LEED certification, a minimum of 40 points is required. Lutron lighting control can contribute toward attaining important LEED certification points in six of the seven credit categories. See Lutron’s LEED v4 Brochure.



Sustainable Sites

Eliminate light trespass from the site and building, improve night sky access, and reduce your development's impact on nocturnal environments. Use window treatments and switching to keep lighting within the building, which prevents light pollution at night. Reduce light levels and reach acceptable uniformity ratios by dimming lights.

Lutron Solutions
  • Dimming and switching systems
  • Integration of controllable window treatments
  • Astronomical timeclock scheduling
  • Occupancy sensors

Energy & Atmosphere

Outfitting your project with lighting controls helps reduce the negative environmental effects associated with excessive energy usage. Using lighting control can conserve 60% or more in lighting energy and 20% or more in HVAC energy. Lutron systems provide many energy-saving strategies. To garner the maximum points this category provides, Lutron controls are critical.

Lutron Solutions
  • Dimming and switching systems
  • Integration of controllable window treatments
  • Astronomical timeclock scheduling
  • "Tune-to-task" management of high-end light levels
  • Daylight harvesting
  • Occupancy sensors

Indoor Environmental Quality

LEED also evaluates your project's internal environment. In multi-occupant spaces, provisions must be made for high level HVAC and lighting system controls. These controls promote comfort, productivity, and well being amongst the building's occupants.


You can also provide a connection between indoor spaces and the outdoors through the introduction of daylight and views to the outside into the regularly occupied areas of the building.


Lutron Solutions
  • Personal control of light
  • "Tune-to-task" management of high-end light levels
  • Occupancy sensors
  • Integration of controllable window treatments
  • Daylight harvesting
  • Astronomical timeclock scheduling

Innovation & Design Process

Provide design teams and projects the opportunity to be awarded points for exceptional performance above the requirements set by the LEED Rating System and/or innovative performance in Green Building categories not specifically addressed by LEED. Lutron project teams will help you implement your innovative ideas by incorporating the latest lighting controls into your design.




Visit the USGBC website

Living Building ChallengeSM

Many building rating systems today are focused on reducing a building’s negative impact on the environment. The Living Building Challenge (LBC) is a certification tool managed by the International Living Future Institute (ILFI) which promotes projects to become truly regenerative and leave a positive impact on the environment. The Living Building Challenge contains seven Petals, or categories comprised of multiple Imperatives, or requirements (20 in total). The Petals that make up the LBC include Place, Water, Energy, Health and Happiness, Materials, Equity and Beauty.


The Living Building Challenge contains three types of certification:
  • Living Certification – meeting all imperatives assigned to the project typology: new buildings, renovations, or landscape/infrastructure.
  • Petal Certification – attaining at least three of the seven Petals by meeting all Imperatives within each Petal.
  • Net Zero Energy Certification – supplying 100% of a building’s net annual energy demand through on-site renewable sources, without combustion. Imperatives: 01 Limits to Growth, 06 Net Positive Energy (reduced to 100%), 19 Beauty + Spirit, and 20 Inspiration + Education must be met.

Lutron lighting and shade controls can contribute toward meeting imperatives within three of the seven Petal categories.

The Living Building Challenge standard along with each of the Petal Handbooks, detailing the requirements of each Imperative including any applicable exceptions, and detailed documentation requirements can be found on the ILFI website.


Net Positive Energy

All projects required to meet this imperative must utilize renewable energy sources as well as energy storage for resiliency. To accomplish this, 105% of the projects net annual energy needs must be supplied by on-site renewable energy. One way to help achieve this is through the reduction of the building or site’s energy demand. Using lighting controls can conserve up to 60% or more in lighting energy and 20% or more in HVAC energy when used in coordination with automated shading controls. Lutron systems provide many energy-saving strategies to help make this imperative easier to achieve.

Lutron Solutions
  • Dimming and switching systems
  • Integration of controllable window treatments
  • Astronomical timeclock scheduling
  • Daylight harvesting
  • Occupancy sensors

Healthy Indoor Environment

This Imperative is focused around good indoor air quality for occupants. It requires each project to create a Healthy Interior Environment Plan explaining how the project will achieve and maintain a healthy interior environment. One part of this Imperative involves compliance with CDPH Standard Method v1.1-2010. This standard targets products and materials holding the potential to emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Many Lutron shade fabrics are UL Greenguard Gold certified, which is one of the possible methods to comply with this requirement.

Lutron Solutions
  • Integration of controllable window treatments

Red List

Projects are required to avoid using products that have a negative impact on human health and the ecosystem. The Red List contains materials and chemicals to avoid when specifying products for a project that is required to meet this Imperative. Small electrical components may be exempt from these requirements if they are RoHS compliant. Many RoHS-compliant Lutron products can be used to help meet this Imperative.

Lutron Solutions
  • Check with Lutron for details on products that are RoHS compliant

Visit the ILFI website

What is the WELL Building Standard?

The WELL Building Standard is a performance based standard that focuses exclusively on human health and wellness as it relates to the built environment.

WELL is grounded in science and evidence based design. WELL Certified spaces may help create a built environment that improves the nutrition, fitness, mood, sleep patterns and performance of its occupants.

Lutron lighting fixtures, lighting controls, and automated shades can play an essential role in meeting many of the provisions of the standard.


WELL Certification

Certification starts with seven concepts that influence human behaviors and define a wellness-focused environment: air, water, nourishment, light, fitness, comfort, and mind. Under these concepts there are “features” or provisions which have requirements to be met. Some features are mandatory “preconditions”. Others are optional “optimizations”. There are three levels of WELL Certification: Silver, Gold and Platinum. Silver level certification is achieved by meeting 100 percent of the WELL preconditions applicable to the project type in all concepts. Gold level certification is achieved by meeting all of the WELL preconditions, as well as 40 percent or more of the optimization features. Platinum level certification is achieved by meeting all of the WELL preconditions, as well as 80 percent or more of the optimization features.


Lutron Solutions Support Many Preconditions and Optimizations in the WELL Standard

Light fixture selection, lighting controls, and window shades play a role in all preconditions and most optimizations in the WELL Light concept. A smart, integrated lighting and shade control solution can specifically help achieve precondition features in Visual Lighting Design (#53), Circadian Lighting Design (#54), and Solar Glare Control (#56), and is essential for optimization features in Automated Shading and Dimming Controls (#60) and Daylight Modeling (#62). Plus, Lutron lighting and shading solutions can contribute to features in the Comfort, Mind, and Innovation concepts. See table below.


Concept Area (P)Precondition
(O)Optimization
Feature
Air P 4. VOC Reduction
Light P 53. Visual Lighting Design
P 54. Circadian Lighting Design
P 55. Electric Light Glare Control
P 56. Solar Glare Control
O 58. Color Quality
O 60. Automated Shading and Dimming Controls
O 62. Daylight Modeling
Comfort P 74. Exterior Noise Intrusion
Mind P 88. Biophilia I – Qualitative
Innovation O 101 to 105. Innovation Features


Achieving both WELL and LEED Platinum certifications – rising to the challenge
The ASID project set a very high bar for sustainable, wellness-oriented, energy efficient lighting design. The design helped to achieve all the lighting Features in the WELL Light Concept with the exception of daylight fenestration. By including automated shades that used a sheer, GreenScreen Evolve low VOC emitting fabric, ASID was able to use the shade fabric to help meet the mandatory preconditions for Feature #4: VOC reduction, Feature #74: Exterior Noise Intrusion (shades can help reduce the sound coming in through the windows), and Feature #88: Biophilia (shades can preserve the views to the outside which helps provide a connection to nature for the building occupants).


Ultimately, the ASID headquarters met the stringent requirements of both WELL and LEED certifications, with the integrated lighting and shading control system contributing in three WELL concepts and four LEED categories, including almost all the energy efficiency points.

Visit the WELL Building Standard

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